Radon Reduction Services (Mitigation)
Radon Reduction
3 3 0 - 2 8 9 - 9 9 2 4
Some of the most common types of ASD include the following:
*Sub-Slab Depressurization     *Drain Tile Depressurization     *Sump Pit Depressurization
*Sub-Membrane Depressurization     *Block Wall Depressurization      *Perimeter Drain Depressurization

All of these systems operate under the same theory.  The system creates a mild suction or vacuum in order to remove
the radon gas from the soil, before it enters the home.  The radon is collected into a PVC pipe, and routed so that the
radon is vented safely outside above the roof line.
The process starts with drilling a 4" to 5" hole through the
slab, generally 10" to 12" from the foundation wall in most
basements. This will be where the system creates its suction.  
This hole location is called the "suction point".

A small pit will be hand excavated under the slab through this
hole creating an area for excellent vacuum pressure.

PVC pipe will be installed and sealed into the suction point
with a strong silicone type adhesive.
A white PVC pipe, 3" diameter,
schedule 40 thickness, will be
installed into the suction point.  
The pipe will be routed up the
basement wall and through the
rim joist.  At that point the pipe
may exit to the outside of the
home, or into the garage area,
or in some cases through
closets or hidden chase areas.

Most suction pipes are  located
in a basement area. If the home
does not have a basement, it
may be  located on a first floor
slab area, or even a crawlspace
area.
This is a typical external type system installed on
a single story home.  The suction pipe is routed
from the basement to the outside of the home at
ground level.  

The fan is the rounded area near the base of the
home.  It is designed for radon mitigation and
suitable to mount outdoors.  The fan is mounted
to the pipe with flexible rubber couplings to
help eliminate vibrations and to make it easier to
service.  We always use "white" couplings (not
black)  for a better appearance.  

Notice that the vent opening at the top of the
pipe is above the gutter height of the house.  It
is required that the vent opening be at least 10
feet off ground level, above the eave, and also
certain distances away from open-able windows.

We take great pride in locating outside mounted
systems and  will work with you to find an
aesthetically pleasing location.
This photo shows the vent pipe routed through the
attached garage on an internal system.  The pipe is all
white so it blends with most garage walls and we make
every effort to mount the pipe as close to the wall as
possible.

The pipe is typically schedule 40 S&D PVC, which is very
thick walled pipe, and very durable.  There should be no
concern for any type of damage from normal use of the
garage area.  Noise will also be very minimal, almost silent.

The red part in the middle of the pipe is the vacuum
manometer.  This is a gauge that measures vacuum in the
pipe and serves as a visual monitoring device for the fan.  
If the gauge reads "0" then it means the fan has either
been accidentally turned off, or has failed.  This is an
important part to the system because you most likely won't
"hear" the system running, and a visual monitor will help
you to know that the system
is running.
This is a photo of the vent pipe on the
rooftop. It looks just like some of the
existing toilet stacks on the home and
blends in well.  

There is an aluminum screen on the end
of the pipe to ensure that no "critters"
will enter the pipe.
This is the vacuum manometer.  It's only function is to
provide a visual indication that the mitigation fan is
running.  This type of device is almost foolproof and
functions well.

Also pictured are the required system labels indicating
the installation date, contractor, and type of system.

Audible alarm type devices are also available. These
devices will sound a loud alarm when the system fails
or has no vacuum.  Some of these systems can be
finicky and require batteries to operate properly.  
These devices are available by special order.
Some homes have sump pit drainage systems
and it may be necessary to install a special
sealed cover in order for our mitigation system
to work properly.

It also may be an option to use the sump pit as
our suction point.  In this photo we see our
suction pipe connected to the special cover
with a removable rubber fitting.  

These covers are removable with basic hand
tools to allow servicing of the sump pump.

It is not necessary to use the sump pit as as the
area for installing the suction pipe. We actually
prefer to locate the suction pipe in the concrete
floor because it will complicate the sump
opening less, and it will work just as well.
SUCTION POINT
ROOF VENT PIPE
3 3 0 - 2 8 9 - 9 9 2 4
The following photos explain the process of mitigation:
FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION
REGARDING MITIGATION INSTALLATION PRACTICES,
PLEASE REFER TO THE FOLLOWING LINK:

OFFICIAL EPA RADON RMS
(Radon Mitigation Standards)
*Code for installation
SUCTION PIPE
INTERNAL SYSTEM
LOCATED INSIDE
ATTACHED GARAGE
ATTIC MOUNTED FAN
Here we see the mitigation fan and exhaust pipe mounted
in the garage attic space.  You will notice that the fan is
hard wired to a shut off switch, which is used for servicing
the fan.  You will also notice that the pipe is elevated and
mounted securely to a 2x4.   Notice the bracing under the
fan and also the strapping securing the pipe in place.  The
pipe is also sloped away from the fan to aid in
condensation drainage.
VACUUM MANOMETER
SUCTION PIPE
SEALED SUMP COVER
WITH A SUCTION PIPE
INSTALLED
EXTERNAL SYSTEM